Hot Mustard! a favorite...

Hot Mustard from mustard seeds grown at the Annisquam Herb Farm. 

Collected and separated from the pods with patience.

It is always worth the effort!

The taste is similar to traditional German mustard according to one mustard aficionado who was very disappointed when we did not have enough mustard seed to prepare them for last year's Arts & Crafts Show!

Chocolate Mug Cake Gift Package

New this year!

The Chocolate Mug Cake Gift Package 


  • Mug 
  • Instructions on creating your own Chocolate Cake in a matter of minutes! 
  • Recipe Card so you can do it again!

Annisquam Arts & Crafts Show 2016

Slate Hors d'Oeuvres Tray, Hot Mustard, Basil Pesto
by the Annisquam Herb Farm
The 32nd consecutive year
Annisquam Arts and Crafts Show

October 8th and 9th, 2016  

Saturday and Sunday, 10a - 5p
Annisquam Village Hall, 36 Leonard Street, Gloucester MA 01930
Free to all
A sampling of offers by the Annisquam Herb Farm 

Annisquam Concord Grape Preserve & more

Canadian wool hat

One-of-a-kind hats for children

Cotton potholder

Soft, Cozy Scarf

Canadian Wool Shawl/Scarf

Caring for Rosemary

Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis)

Growing rosemary in eastern Massachusetts

Rosemary is drought-tolerant and can be grown in pots. The wind is the culprit here as it dries out the leaves. 

Be sure there is plenty of drainage. Rosemary does not like wet roots. In the summer you can plants it in the garden, dug it up in the fall and put in a pot with soil that will drain well. Keep on an enclosed unheated porch or in a room with no heat. It needs some sun light but does not require direct sun.

We keep ours in an unheated greenhouse and mulch with hay. The plant will bloom most of the winter there. Fertilize once a month with a good quality fertilizer like Neptune's Harvest. Trim as you need the rosemary for your recipes and to keep the plant full. 


A long, dry Summer...

This summer the Concord grapes vines did well with less moisture in the ground under the arbor as did the lavender and the foxglove in other parts of the garden. The basil is still doing well especially the plants in a very large pot. The peach trees had no blossoms due the the warm spell early in the season followed by a frost. The pear tree bloomed but all the blossoms dropped and no fruit appeared. The potatoes and beets are much smaller then usual. The broccoli is finally coming along. The winter squash and pumpkins are veery small and there are not many of them. 

More attention needed to be paid to mulching earlier in the growing season. It keeps the soil at a more even temperature, retains moisture and keeps the weeds under control. And much more attention to the changes that took place!

More photos at: Annisquam Herb Farm on FaceBook

The final preparations are in full swing for the Annual Annisquam Arts & Crafts Show! Mark your calendar, October 8 & 9, 2016, 10a-5p, Annisquam Village hall, Leonard St., Gloucester MA 01930
Hand knit, one of a kinds items, preserves and gift items



There are always things that seem more important than vacuuming. 

This house is not large. Once started the cleaning really does not take that must time.

I found the perfect vacuum for the job. The rug beater attachment pulled the dirst out of the area rugs. The regular head has a dusting pad so you vacuum up the grit and dust anything left behind!

The whole vacuum assembles and disassemble very easily. The dust canister is super easy to empty. It is so light weight it is hard to believe it can do such a wonderful job. And is stores in a very small space. And ... as if that were not enough ... you can use just the head unit with a the small nozzle to clean the peat moss out of the back of the car.

The bonus - I get to spend more time in the greenhouse!


Another Great Book

Seedlings started in the house now are growing well in the solar heated greenhouse: broccoli, cabbage, onions, leeks and tomatoes. Potatoes were planted in the floor of the greenhouse last fall and should be popping up soon. Parsley and volunteer celery have been available all winter. The curly kale and the Italian kale are coming back and are a delicious addition to the Sunday morning omelet. Out in the open the red mustard has sprouted. We hope for a mustard seed crop to harvest this year. Last year the birds ate most of the beautiful little seeds.

 In  Four Season Harvest you will learn how easy it is the grow delicious food all year long even in a small space.

Book for a gardener

A Must Have  

I keep this book close at hand all year long. I figured if Eliot Coleman could grow food on the Penobscot I would have a pretty good chance here on Cape Ann, a few miles South.

I have used the soil blockers successfully. But the very best advise is how to improve the soil.


Healing salve ...

This beautiful salve, inspired by the LaerningHerbs Medicine Kit purchased many years ago, is a staple in the first aid kit. When my grandchildren were young they called it boo-boo cream. It is a simple recipe of olive oil, beeswax and lavender essential oil.

Recently a dear friend skinned both shins severely. Her doctor suggested cocoa butter once the open wounds had closed to help with the scabs. She had bought a jar labeled cocoa butter at the drug store. The ingredients listed mineral oil and fragrance among other items. Not what I would have chosen! As soon as I returned home I went to work creating a salve with organic, unrefined cocoa butter, olive oil, beeswax, vitamin E and lavender essential oil for her legs. As far as I am concerned, a much better ointment for the skin.

These small containers make wonderful gifts and items for your organization's holiday sale. You can be assured they will be used and requested next year! (Don't let anyone know how easy it is :) )

PS: The Medicine Kit is a great gift too!

If you do not have a local supplier you can buy the beeswax, cocoa butter and the essential oil from Mountain Rose Herbs


The Backyard Growers Program on Cape Ann

This is a wonderful program on Cape Ann!

Since 2010 Backyard Growers has built over 150 raised bed gardens, serving hundreds of Gloucester residents. We serve 100% of public school students from preschool to 6th grade, providing true seed-to-fork experiences for Gloucester kids. 

The Backyard Growers Program (BYG), in partnership with The Food Project, helps low- to moderate-income Gloucester residents create sustainable backyard vegetable gardens. They provide raised beds, compost, garden installation, seedlings, seeds, training, and mentoring.

To read more...For more information:

You can LIKE Backyard Growers Program on FaceBook.